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Create the luscious garden of your dreams with these outdoor plants. We stock all kinds of flower seeds so that you can create a colourful spectacle in your garden from early spring to late autumn. Suppose you're not interested in using individual flower seeds to curate your garden. In that case, we also sell packs of floral bedding plants that promise brilliant colours throughout the year.

Content:
  • Subscribe to our NEW newsletter
  • Garden Centre
  • 14 Giant Perennials That Will Make a Big Impact in Your Garden
  • large plants
  • How To Keep Potted Plants Alive
  • Buy Indoor & Outdoor Plants - By Type
  • 15 Easy Plants That Give You More Bang for Your Buck
  • 20 Great Plants That Grow in Shade
  • 30 Great Plants for Northern Gardens: The Complete List
  • An easy instant garden with mature plants.
WATCH RELATED VIDEO: BIG LEAF PLANTS for a tropical style garden

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With summer in full swing, it's hard not to admire the yards and gardens around town that are filled with greenery and colorful blooms. If you've always assumed that your yard was too dry, too shady, or that the soil was too sandy to support such beautiful plants—guess again.

In fact, these common problems may just inspire you to get more creative with your plant picks. With expert advice and care tips from a couple of plant pros, we've ID'd 15 pretty plants that will thrive in even the least plant-friendly spaces. Fragrant, flowering dianthus will not only survive in sandy soil, but it will also fill your backyard with color and a lovely, slightly spicy scent.

If you have a shady yard that doesn't get much sun, skip the grass and carpet the ground with common oak sedge, which adds textural interest to the area. With these hard-to-kill plants readily available at nurseries and garden centers, there's no reason to let a dry, low-light space stop you from creating a showstopping backyard.

If your backyard doesn't get much sun throughout the day, it can be tough to find attractive plants that will thrive in the shadows. To find the best shade-loving plants around, we asked Justin Hancock, a horticulturist at Costa Farms , for the company's top picks.

Headquartered in Miami, Florida, Costa Farms supplies houseplants and garden plants to retailers and garden centers across the country, so the team is well-versed in selecting plants that will survive in real backyards. The shade-surviving plant at the top of the list: ajuga. It offers adorable spikes of blue-purple flowers in spring, then a mat of dense foliage the rest of the gardening season," Hancock says. To up the visual interest, look for variegated selections, such as "Burgundy Glow," which has shades of pink and silver in its leaves.

Plus, ajuga comes back every year, so you can plant it once and enjoy it for years to come. This plant's arrowhead-shaped leaves are readily found in shades of red, pink, and white, so you can coordinate this pick with the other plants in your garden.

Costa Farm's favorite hue? You can treat caladium as an annual and leave it in the ground throughout the year, or you can dig it up and store it in a cool place for the winter. If you're searching for a failproof plant that can thrive in the north or the south, in sun or in shade, in a garden bed or in a container garden, then the persian shield is for you.

This colorful, leafy plant is more than just durable, it's also a true standout in the garden. Treat this tropical plant as an annual, or if you're adventurous, Hancock recommends bringing it indoors in the winter and keeping it in a bright spot. To get even more shade-surviving selections, we turned to the plant pros at the Chicago Botanic Garden.

Jacob Burns , the curator of herbaceous perennial plants, guided us through the varieties best suited for deep shade. Even when hidden beneath a conifer or tucked into the darkest corner of your yard, these plants are likely to thrive. One low-light pick at the top of Burns' list was the oakleaf hydrangea. Bold, textural leaves and large cone-shaped flowers make this shrub an option with serious curb appeal for the front yard.

To enjoy blossoms throughout the season, opt for the oakleaf hydrangea. If you're dealing with a backyard that's both shady and dry, the hosta is one of the few plants that will be happy to call it home. Growing to about 16 inches tall and 30 inches wide, a group of hostas can help fill the space in a low-light garden.

In fact, most hostas prefer some shade and, the darker the plant, the more likely it is to thrive in a dim environment. When planting in deep shade, Burns recommends planting the "First Frost" variety of hosta, which has pretty variegated leaves with pale lavender flowers. This free-growing ground cover is similar to a soft carpet for your garden.

Once planted, it will spread out over the yard, filling in any open areas without choking out the plants that already live there. Pair this shady plant with a flowering, low-light pick, such as a hellebore, that will bring a pop of color to the lush green landscape. If your yard happens to be situated in a bright and dry area, choosing plants that will thrive there can be just as difficult as finding shade-surviving varieties.

One of Hancock's favorite picks for a drought-prone area is the agave , a low-water succulent that makes a statement anywhere you plant it. Our favorites are variegated types that bring in an extra splash of color," he suggests. Look for two-tone leaves with distinctive colorings, such as those with yellow borders and deep green centers, to up the visual interest.

Think again! Because its trunk stores water, you don't have to water it—even in times of drought," he says. Whether planting in the backyard or designing an indoor container backyard, pair this flowering plant with cacti or more classic spiky succulents for a desert-inspired garden that will survive even the hottest summer.

Plant desert rose as an annual in the north, or treat it as perennial in frost-free regions. Even at the height of summer, this low-maintenance plant rarely needs to be watered. And because there is a seemingly endless variety of sedum available, ranging from low-growing groundcovers to upright bloomers, the best plant to pair beside sedum, is, well, more sedum. To take the guesswork out of planting small individual plants, Hancock recommends buying a sedum tile a "living carpet" made of a patchwork of smaller plants , which can often be found at garden centers.

To settle a sedum tile into its new environment, simply drop it onto loose soil, water well to start, and watch it grow. If you're lucky enough to have a yard that's neither shady nor dry, it may still face a third common gardening dilemma: sandy soil. If you're a seaside gardener searching for a plant that can survive not only sandy soil, but also salt sprays and not-so-gentle seaside breezes, low-growing armeria will shine in your beachside backyard.

Measuring just 6 to 10 inches tall, this ground-hugging plant seems to duck underneath the wind in blustery areas. Especially on a warm day, this flowering plant's lovely fragrance will greet you long before you spot the beautiful blossoms in shades of purple, pink, white, and lavender. While some varieties of dianthus bloom in spring, others, such as "Kahori," start in the spring and continue to flower all summer long. In addition to the spectacular blooms, annual dianthus isn't afraid to show off its blue-green foliage, making it a welcome addition to garden beds or potted gardens.

When selecting plants for sandy soil, Jacob Burns from the Chicago Botanic Garden leans towards low-maintenance options, such a "Primrose Beauty," a type of flowering shrub that favors well-drained soil. Known for its pale yellow blooms, this variety fares best when situated in full sun. And the best part? From June until September, the blooms come out in full force, but with a maximum height around three feet, this shrub won't take over your garden and will play nicely with other plants.

The bright golden flowers will bloom for over a month from June to July, and they will continue to bloom into the fall if you deadhead the spent flowers. Considering that its blooms don't seem to mind a trim every now and then, this plant makes an excellent addition to a cutting garden. Burns suggests planting butterfly weed, not only because its vibrant orange blossoms will attract compliments, but also because it's the monarch butterfly host plant, and planting milkweed supports the species' survival.

Monarch butterflies lay their eggs on the leaves of the milkweed plant, since the leaves are the only source of food for monarch caterpillars. Native to North America, milkweed grows naturally almost everywhere across the country, except for parts of the Pacific Northwest, so it's adept at surviving not only sandy soil, but also the varied weather conditions across the country. Introduce this showy, no-fuss plant to your garden, and don't be surprised if it steals the show with its colorful flowers and entourage of butterflies.

As a professional plant curator at the Chicago Botanic Garden, Jacob Burns is continually considering which plants will coordinate well with others. Luckily, lilac sage makes the matchmaking process remarkably easy.

While well-drained, sandy soil typically provides a decent support system for these flowers, if they begin to droop under their own weight, Burns recommends cutting the stalks down and starting fresh.

A relatively long bloom period, from July through September, will brighten up the garden for months, and deadheading faded blooms could help extend the season even longer. If it's scented flowers you're searching for, check out our list of favorite fragrant flowers to add to your garden or backyard.

RS Home Designers. By Katie Holdefehr Updated June 25,Save FB Tweet More. Impossible-to-Kill Outdoor Plants, agave plant. Start Slideshow. Credit: Costa Farms. Best for: Shady Backyards If your backyard doesn't get much sun throughout the day, it can be tough to find attractive plants that will thrive in the shadows.

Best for: Shady Backyards "Bring a touch of the tropics to your shaded backyard with the big, beautiful leaves of caladium ," Hancock recommends. Persian Shield. Best for: Shady Backyards If you're searching for a failproof plant that can thrive in the north or the south, in sun or in shade, in a garden bed or in a container garden, then the persian shield is for you.

Oakleaf Hydrangea. Credit: William Bishoff. Best for: Shady Backyards To get even more shade-surviving selections, we turned to the plant pros at the Chicago Botanic Garden. Credit: Paul S. Best for: Shady Backyards If you're dealing with a backyard that's both shady and dry, the hosta is one of the few plants that will be happy to call it home.

Carex Pensylvanica. Best for: Shady Backyards "This is a great alternative to grass for a shady spot," Burns says. Best for: Drought-Prone Backyards If your yard happens to be situated in a bright and dry area, choosing plants that will thrive there can be just as difficult as finding shade-surviving varieties.

Desert Rose. Best for: Drought-Prone Backyards "Think all succulents are spiny? Sedum Tiles. Best for: Drought-Prone Backyards Even at the height of summer, this low-maintenance plant rarely needs to be watered.

Armeria Ballerina. Best for: Backyards With Sandy Soil If you're lucky enough to have a yard that's neither shady nor dry, it may still face a third common gardening dilemma: sandy soil. Dianthus Kahori. Best for: Backyards With Sandy Soil " Dianthus is one of those plants you may be able to smell before you see it," Hancock says. Credit: Chicago Botanic Garden Photos. Best for: Backyards With Sandy Soil When selecting plants for sandy soil, Jacob Burns from the Chicago Botanic Garden leans towards low-maintenance options, such a "Primrose Beauty," a type of flowering shrub that favors well-drained soil.

Zagreb, Threadleaf Tickseed. Best for: Backyards With Sandy Soil "Bees and butterflies love this plant," Burns says, so if you're looking to attract winged beauties to your yard, this flowering plant will soon become your go-to variety. Butterfly Weed. Best for: Backyards With Sandy Soil Burns suggests planting butterfly weed, not only because its vibrant orange blossoms will attract compliments, but also because it's the monarch butterfly host plant, and planting milkweed supports the species' survival.

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Garden Centre

Together, our gardens are a huge living landscape and a really important habitat for a range of insects, birds and mammals. The way we choose to manage our green spaces can make a big difference to the natural world. By growing wildlife-friendly plants you can attract more animals to your garden and create a haven for nature. Wildlife gardening expert Dave Goulson shares some of the best plants you can grow to create a wildlife-friendly garden and give pollinators and other species a helping hand. The sugar-rich fluid is indeed packed with energy, but it also contains other much-sought-after compounds.

Many gardeners prefer to 'go big' in their garden with giant plants. Whether it's because you have lots of space, or you just prefer the visual aesthetic of.

14 Giant Perennials That Will Make a Big Impact in Your Garden

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Large plants

Unsure About Your Order? We Can Help. Ferny evergreen leaves and lots of yellow flowers in spring. Survives most winters anywhere. Reliably hardy in large cities and near the coast.

Combine great plants into a beautiful northern garden, like this Minneapolis garden. One of the MSHS Facebook fans requested that we put up a list of all the 30 great plants for northern gardens that we profiled in November.

How To Keep Potted Plants Alive

This can be a challenge for gardeners, who need to pick plants that can withstand what the elements have to throw at them. All of the plants below are native or long-established in the UK, meaning they are well-suited to our climate. They are also ideal for supporting our wildlife, which has evolved to live alongside them. When choosing a tree or plant, remember to consider the amount of space available, soil type, light levels and wind exposure. Also known as mountain ash, these hardy trees grow in most soils but prefer light, well-drained spots. Commonly found in woodland at higher altitudes, it can grow just as well in a garden.

Buy Indoor & Outdoor Plants - By Type

Track your order through my orders. Patio pots don't just need to be filled with pretty bedding plants every year, why not try plants that you can keep in their containers all year round, that are perfect for patios! Our patios, decks and outdoor spaces are more and more becoming an extension of our homes, and just like indoors, we like to decorate the areas we spend a lot of time in so that they look good and feel inviting. A really great way to do this on a patio is with larger potted plants, such as evergreen shrubs , standards and even hardy perennials that will look spectacular throughout the year. We've put together a list of our top ten patio plants that will grow really well in pots and containers all year round, a variety of shapes and sizes to suit all areas and budgets too. This compact, evergreen shrub is a popular choice for borders and patio containers, where plants will provide colour and interest all year round.

10 Great Plants for Shady Gardens The once-a-year perennial plant sale at our company's Vermont garden center is a huge event.

15 Easy Plants That Give You More Bang for Your Buck

Plants with large foliage offer a bold look and add a tropical jungle vibe to the gardens. If you too want to add the same appeal, here are the best Big Leaf Outdoor Plants you can grow! This big leaf perennial has hairy, thick, veined leaves that grow up to feet across on pink hairy stems. Plant it in full sun to partial shade using rich, moist soil on the edges of pond or stream or bog gardens.

20 Great Plants That Grow in Shade

Make a donation. It can be a challenge to establish plant cover under the canopy of large trees. Shade and lack of moisture are both problems in these conditions, but there are a number of plants that will tolerate these situations. Plants growing under tree canopies often suffer from poor growing conditions.

Of all the ways to zhoosh up your place and generally lift the mood, a bit of greenery is right up there.

30 Great Plants for Northern Gardens: The Complete List

Search Search. Menu Sections. Diarmuid Gavin. My list of top garden plants? That changes every day! How do you pick favourites when we can cultivate so many?

An easy instant garden with mature plants.

Shade lover: Peace lily Spathiphyllum A very popular indoor plant, this glossy-leafed beauty thrives in a warm, bright spot out of direct sun. The white blooms are very long-lasting. Shade lover: Fuchsia These are traditionally shade-lovers but the Sun Kisses range also takes full sun. Shade lover: Port wine magnolia Michelia figo A slow-growing yet very worthwhile large shrub.


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